2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Sep 21, 2020  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Music - Applied Jazz/Pop Woodwinds

  
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    MJW 181 - Applied Jazz/Pop Woodwinds


    An exploration of technique, creativity, and artistic expression within the student’s applied area. Special care is given by the instructor to the development of the individual musical goals of the music student and the achievement of collegiate music standards. Both semesters.

    Credits: 2
  
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    MJW 182 - Applied Jazz/Pop Woodwinds


    An exploration of technique, creativity, and artistic expression within the student’s applied area. Special care is given by the instructor to the development of the individual musical goals of the music student and the achievement of collegiate music standards. Both semesters.

    Credits: 2
  
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    MJW 231 - Applied Jazz/Pop Woodwinds (Secondary)


    An exploration of technique, creativity, and artistic expression within the student’s secondary applied area. Special care is given by the instructor to the development of the individual musical goals of the music student and the achievement of collegiate music standards. This course offers private music instruction for the non-music major and for the music major studying woodwinds as a secondary applied. Both semesters.

    Credits: 1
  
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    MJW 232 - Applied Jazz/Pop Woodwinds (Secondary)


    An exploration of technique, creativity, and artistic expression within the student’s secondary applied area. Special care is given by the instructor to the development of the individual musical goals of the music student and the achievement of collegiate music standards. This course offers private music instruction for the non-music major and for the music major studying woodwinds as a secondary applied. Both semesters.

    Credits: 1
  
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    MJW 281 - Applied Jazz/Pop Woodwinds


    An exploration of technique, creativity, and artistic expression within the student’s applied area. Special care is given by the instructor to the development of the individual musical goals of the music student and the achievement of collegiate music standards. Both semesters.

    Credits: 2
  
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    MJW 282 - Applied Jazz/Pop Woodwinds


    An exploration of technique, creativity, and artistic expression within the student’s applied area. Special care is given by the instructor to the development of the individual musical goals of the music student and the achievement of collegiate music standards. Both semesters.

    Credits: 2
  
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    MJW 381 - Applied Jazz/Pop Woodwinds


    An exploration of technique, creativity, and artistic expression within the student’s applied area. Special care is given by the instructor to the development of the individual musical goals of the music student and the achievement of collegiate music standards. Both semesters.

    Credits: 2
  
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    MJW 382 - Applied Jazz/Pop Woodwinds


    An exploration of technique, creativity, and artistic expression within the student’s applied area. Special care is given by the instructor to the development of the individual musical goals of the music student and the achievement of collegiate music standards. Both semesters.

    Credits: 2
  
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    MJW 481 - Applied Jazz/Pop Woodwinds


    An exploration of technique, creativity, and artistic expression within the student’s applied area. Special care is given by the instructor to the development of the individual musical goals of the music student and the achievement of collegiate music standards. Both semesters.

    Credits: 2
  
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    MJW 482 - Applied Jazz/Pop Woodwinds


    An exploration of technique, creativity, and artistic expression within the student’s applied area. Special care is given by the instructor to the development of the individual musical goals of the music student and the achievement of collegiate music standards. Both semesters.

    Credits: 2

Music Ensemble

  
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    MEN 221 - Chapel Worship Team


    A vocal and instrumental ensemble designed to prepare and lead congregational worship for University chapels. Includes an introduction to worship service design and leadership, especially using contemporary musical styles and forms. Membership is open to all students on the basis of audition. Two hours of rehearsal per week. Both semesters.

    Credits: 1/0
  
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    MEN 222 - Early Music Workshop


    A performance class designed to acquaint students with Early Music and Historical Performance practice. In this team-taught course, resident and area professionals skilled in the various instruments related to the repertoire instruct and coach students in preparation for a performance at the semester’s end. The seminar alternates between music of the Baroque and music of the Renaissance. Both semesters.

    Credits: 1/0
  
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    MEN 231 - Symphony Orchestra


    Performance of standard and non-standard orchestral literature, as well as accompaniments for oratorio and concerto performances. Membership is open to all University students. Two-and-a-half hours of rehearsal per week. Both semesters.

    Credits: 1/0
  
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    MEN 232 - Wind Ensemble


    Performance of standard literature and non-standard works for wind ensemble. Membership is open to all University students by audition. Two and one-half hours of rehearsal per week. Both semesters.

    Credits: 1/0
  
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    MEN 233 - Brass Ensemble


    Performance of standard concert literature, as well as transcriptions of hymns and sacred songs. Membership is open to all students. One hour of rehearsal per week. Both semesters.

    Credits: 1/0
  
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    MEN 234 - Handbell Choir


    Performance of standard literature written for English handbells. Membership is open to all students. Sight-reading ability is required. Three hours of rehearsal per week. Both semesters.

    Credits: 1/0
  
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    MEN 235 - Jazz Ensemble


    Performing experience in standard jazz literature. Improvisation is stressed, and jazz performance techniques are discussed. Audition required. Open to all students. Both semesters.

    Credits: 1/0
  
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    MEN 236 - Chamber Music


    The study and performance of standard chamber repertoire based on student instrumentation, including independent and coached preparation. Both semesters.

    Credits: 1/0
  
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    MEN 241 - Chorale


    Performance of standard choral works selected from various periods and styles. Emphasis is placed on sacred choral literature. The chorale performs on- and off-campus during the school year and takes an extended annual tour. Membership is open to all students on the basis of audition/interview. Four hours of rehearsal per week. Both semesters.

    Credits: 1/0
  
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    MEN 242 - Chamber Singers


    Approximately 10-16 voices selected for their vocal quality and sight reading ability. Performance of standard chamber literature selected from various periods and styles. Membership is open to all students on the basis of audition/interview. Three hours of rehearsal per week. Both semesters.

    Credits: 1/0
  
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    MEN 243 - Community Chorus


    Performance of a major choral work with orchestra annually. Membership is open to all students. Two hours of rehearsal per week, beginning in mid-October with a concert in early February. Register noncredit in the fall and one credit in the spring. Both semesters.

    Credits: 1/0
  
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    MEN 253 - Opera Theater


    An introduction to the world of opera and music theater, giving attention to dramatic movement, emotional interpretation, staging principles, scenery, props, costumes, makeup, and lighting. Either semester.

    Credits: 1/0
  
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    MEN 254 - Contemporary Christian Music Ensemble


    A small vocal/instrumental ensemble that performs contemporary Christian music for ministry at churches, youth meetings, retreats, and banquets. Membership is open to all students by audition. Participation in both fall and spring semesters is required. Two hours of rehearsal per week. Both semesters

    Credits: 1/0
  
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    MEN 255 - Gospel Choir


    Selected repertory of choral works from the African American tradition of religious music. Influences of world music traditions are also explored. No previous musical experience necessary. Membership is open to all students on the basis of audition. Both semesters.

    Credits: 1/0
  
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    MEN 261 - Accompanying Techniques I


    A study of the piano as an accompanying medium for standard vocal and instrumental literature, including congregational singing. Special emphasis is given to stylistic problems, orchestral reductions, and ensemble musicianship. This course is designed as a two-semester course (one credit each). Semester I (Fall) emphasizes various areas of sacred music accompaniment that the student will encounter (hymn playing, solo, and anthem accompaniment). Also explored are recitative, aria, and chorus accompaniment, including an introduction to basic performance practice as it relates to the organ and harpsichord. Semester II (Spring) focuses on the study of accompaniments for art songs, operatic arias, and instrumental works. The keyboard major must pass each semester once for credit, but is permitted to take either part multiple times as well. The course satisfies an ensemble requirement each semester taken. First semester.

    Credits: 1
  
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    MEN 262 - Accompanying Techniques II


    A study of the piano as an accompanying medium for standard vocal and instrumental literature, including congregational singing. Special emphasis is given to stylistic problems, orchestral reductions, and ensemble musicianship. This course is designed as a two-semester course (one credit each). Semester I (Fall) emphasizes various areas of sacred music accompaniment that the student will encounter (hymn playing, solo, and anthem accompaniment). Also explored are recitative, aria, and chorus accompaniment, including an introduction to basic performance practice as it relates to the organ and harpsichord. Semester II (Spring) focuses on the study of accompaniments for art songs, operatic arias, and instrumental works. The keyboard major must pass each semester once for credit, but is permitted to take either part multiple times as well. The course satisfies an ensemble requirement each semester taken. Second semester.

    Credits: 1

Natural Science

  
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    SCI 131 - The Physical Environment


    A course in which students consider their role with respect to the environment as individuals, as a local community, as Christians, and as members of the global community. Starting locally and ending globally, the students address the management and stewardship of energy, land, soil, and water resources; issues related to air pollution, solid waste management, and hazardous materials; and ecological and environmental principles and their applications on a macroscopic scale. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    SCI 201 - History and Philosophy of Science


    A study of the nature of science and its philosophical foundations through an exploration of the progression of scientific theories. Special emphasis is given to developing scientific literacy. Both semesters.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIB 101

    Credits: 3
  
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    SCI 231 - Physics I: Classical Mechanics


    A course that introduces Newtonian mechanics, including one- and two-dimensional kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion, work, energy, momentum, and rotational motion. Lab course. First semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MAT 241 (may be taken concurrently). Corequisite: SCI 231L

    Credits: 4
  
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    SCI 231L - Physics I Lab


    Lab for SCI 231 Physics I: Classical Mechanics. First semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisite: SCI 231

    Credits: 0
  
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    SCI 232 - Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism


    A study of electricity and magnetism, including electric charge and field, Gauss’ Law, circuits, induction, and Maxwell’s Equations. Lab course. Second semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MAT 242 (may be taken concurrently) & SCI 231. Corequisite: SCI 232L

    Credits: 4
  
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    SCI 232L - Physics II Lab


    Lab for SCI 232 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism. Second semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisite: SCI 232

    Credits: 0
  
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    SCI 331 - Physical Science


    A conceptual study of physics and chemistry, including principles of motion, energy, fluids, electricity, magnetism, and atomic theory and structure. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    SCI 332 - Geology


    An examination of the Earth’s geologic processes and resulting physical features. Specific attention is given to mineralogy, petrology, diastrophism, and stratigraphy, as well as modern geologic theories. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    SCI 333 - Astronomy


    A study of planetary systems, galaxies, the evolution of stars, and the methods used to explore planetary and stellar processes. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    SCI 335 - Environmental Science


    A study of the scientific principles and sociological issues related to environmental science. Emphasis is placed on relationships between human activity and the environment. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    SCI 336 - Earth Science


    A course that examines the interconnectedness of the five Earth systems-lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, exosphere, and biosphere. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    SCI 337 - Chemistry


    A quantitative and conceptual study of inorganic chemistry. Topics include atomic theory, bonding, solutions, acids and bases, salts, equations, chemical arithmetic, and chemical reactions and energy transfer. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    SCI 338 - Marine Science


    A course that explores the related disciplines of biological, chemical, geological, and physical oceanography. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    SCI 341 - Biology 1


    A study of the cellular structures and chemical processes that control the growth and development of organisms. Emphasis is placed on the defining characteristics of living organisms and genetics as they apply to the human body. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    SCI 342 - Anatomy and Physiology


    An examination of the structure and function of the interrelated physiological systems of the human body. Both semesters.

    Credits: 3
  
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    SCI 441 - Biology 2


    A study of the interaction between organisms and their environments. The course explores evolutionary explanations for the diversity of life on Earth and the adaptations of organisms to environmental changes. Either semester.

    Credits: 3

Nonprofit Leadership

  
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    NPL 431 - Grantwriting


    A course that introduces the concepts and skills needed for grantwriting. Students learn the core principles of effective proposal writing for financial support of their nonprofit mission; grantwriting from a funder’s perspective; development planning and prospect research; the five principles of organizational development - mission, market, methods, measures, and means - in the context of grantwriting; grant management; and reporting. Either semester.

    Credits: 3

Organizational Leadership

  
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    ORL 401 - Foundations of Organizational Leadership


    A foundational course that examines the formal and informal structures and processes that are often present in organizations and explores methods for redesigning them so that they are both healthy and productive. The course also provides an overview of systems theory and learning as it applies to functions and behaviors within organizations. Students examine the complexity of these systems, explore behaviors that hinder learning, and what they can do to create an environment that will enhance their abilities to solve complex problems and prevent the formation of new problems. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ORL 402 - Philosophy of Leadership


    A course that examines the major leadership theories and explores issues and challenges associated with leadership in organizations. Students investigate factors that influence effective and ineffective personal and organizational leadership as well as methods of enhancing their own leadership development. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ORL 426 - Power and Influence


    An exploration of the biblical and historical roots of authority, power, influence, the source of power, its use in organizations, its corruption, coercion, politics, and the issues of conflict and powerlessness. Students are encouraged to use a biblical worldview to develop a godly approach to leadership and power. They also examine their hearts and their views and uses of power, explore healthy methods of motivation, negotiation, and conflict management, and examine true empowerment from the perspective of a Christian leader. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ORL 442 - Fundraising and Development


    A course that examines the critical issues of nonprofit public relations and development. One of the greatest challenges facing nonprofit organizations is limited resources. Planned giving, marketing, fundraising, and working with businesses and foundations are among major topics covered. Either semester.

    Credits: 3

Pastoral Ministries

  
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    PMN 321 - Pastoral Care


    A course that considers a biblical foundation for pastoral ministry and the traditional roles of the pastor. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PMN 421 - Church Administration Issues


    A course that considers the role of the pastor as the leader/administrator of a local church. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PMN 431 - Homiletics I


    An introductory course instructing students in the rudiments of expository preaching. Emphasis is placed upon the preparation of expository sermons, sermonic research, and the development of communication skills. First semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    COM 101

    Credits: 3
  
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    PMN 432 - Homiletics II


    A course designed to deepen the student’s understanding of the meaning and nature of expository preaching. Different types of expository sermons are examined, constructed, and delivered by the student. Second semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PMN 431

    Credits: 3

Philosophy

  
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    PHI 301 - Philosophy


    A survey of the history of philosophy and philosophical problems associated with metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of religion. Special attention is given to topics relevant to the Christian thinker. Both semesters.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 331 - Logic


    A study of critical thinking, argument, and reasoning. Specific topics include inductive and deductive reasoning, strength of argument, and logical fallacies. Various kinds of persuasive communications, such as political speeches, advertisements, and sermons, are analyzed logically. Either semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHI 301

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 332 - Aesthetics


    A study of the nature and importance of beauty from a philosophical, theological, and cultural perspective. Special attention is given to making applications in art and technology, as well as developing the student’s ability to render aesthetic judgments. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 431 - Contemporary Christian Philosophy


    A seminar course on the revival of Christian philosophical thinking in the contemporary setting. The major focus is on reading and critiquing recent scholarship by Christian philosophers. Either semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHI 301

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 432 - Ethics


    A study of philosophical ethics, systems of ethics, and various problems in applied ethics. A major goal of the course is to develop and practice applying a Christian perspective for resolving moral dilemmas. Both semesters.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 441 - The Philosophy of C.S. Lewis


    A study of philosophical elements in the writings of C.S. Lewis. Either semester.

    Credits: 3

Politics

  
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    POL 121 - US Government


    An examination of the founding, structure, and operations of the US Government. This course traces and analyzes the branches of the Federal government as well as its relationships with the states from the founding of the US to the present. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    POL 221 - The Supreme Court


    A study of the origins and development of the United States’ legal system from the colonial period to the present. Special emphasis is given to the ways the legal system, the Constitution, and the Supreme Court have influenced and been influenced by social, ideological, political, and economic factors. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    POL 222 - US Congress and Presidency


    An examination of the US Congress and the Presidency focusing on governmental power and public policy. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    POL 223 - State and Local Governments


    An analysis of the division of power between the state and local governments and the history of this relationship. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    POL 321 - Political Philosophy


    A philosophical and historical examination of the role and structure of government. Either semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HIS 212

    Credits: 3
  
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    POL 322 - Writing for Public Affairs


    A course that examines the principles and practices of clear and concise writing to inform and persuade a target public affairs audience. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    POL 331 - Washington Week


    A week in Washington, DC experiencing the historically significant artifacts and the current processes of the US Government. Summer session.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Approval of department chair or dean.

    Credits: 3
  
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    POL 332 - Campaigns and Elections


    An examination of the democratic process of campaigning and elections. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    POL 339 - Topics in Politics


    A course focusing on topics and ideas not fully addressed in the available politics course offerings. Either semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Repeatable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POL 391 - Politics Internship


    An 80-100 hour field experience over the course of 12-15 weeks designed to use the skills and abilities developed in the Politics program and apply them to a workplace related to the student’s particular interest. Both semesters.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of department chair or dean. Repeatable for up to a total of 6 credits.

    Credits: 3
  
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    POL 421 - US Foreign Policy


    An examination of the historical and contemporary role of the United States in world affairs. Second semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    POL 221

    Credits: 3
  
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    POL 422 - US Public Policy


    An historical exploration of US public policy and how it has shaped government, culture, norms, and values. Either semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    POL 221

    Credits: 3
  
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    POL 423 - Comparative Politics


    A comparative study of national political systems and conflict. Second semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    POL 221

    Credits: 3
  
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    POL 424 - Negotiations


    An examination of political negotiations and the analytical tools used to understand institutions and their procedures. First semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    POL 221

    Credits: 3
  
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    POL 491 - Senior Seminar


    A culminating course for Politics majors that leads to a general synthesis of and specific research in the field of study. Graduating seniors only. Both semesters.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Limited to students in their final semester in the Politics (BA) program.
     

    Credits: 3

Psychology

  
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    PSY 101 - General Psychology


    A course designed to provide students with the fundamental principles of psychology, emphasizing basic research and applications in psychology’s major theoretical areas of study. Both semesters.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 221 - Social Psychology


    A course designed to introduce students to the study of human social influence and interaction through an overview of the principal theories in social psychology. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 231 - Research Methods


    An introduction to psychological research techniques and methodology. Students develop skills in conducting, analyzing, and evaluating adequate psychological research. Special attention is given to accurately reading and interpreting popular media and academic research in psychology. First semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MAT 222

    Credits: 4
  
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    PSY 321 - Human Development


    A study of human growth and development in the biological, cognitive, affective, and social domains. Emphasis is placed on the impact culture and socioeconomic status have on human growth and development. Both semesters.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 322 - Educational Psychology


    A study of psychological models, research, and principles applied to the process of education. This course emphasizes developmental models, theories of learning, and human diversity. Both semesters.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 323 - Adolescent Development


    An examination of the individual, interpersonal, and contextual changes and behaviors that are typical of adolescent development. Emphasis is given to the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, emotional, and spiritual changes associated with adolescence. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 324 - Cognitive Psychology


    A course designed to introduce students to basic theoretical models and current issues in the field of cognitive psychology. This course explores the research methodologies and theoretical frameworks used to study cognitive abilities. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 339 - Topics in Psychology


    A course in which the student studies a topic not fully addressed in the available psychology course offerings. Repeatable. Offered on demand.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 341 - Theories of Personality, Social, and Emotional Development


    A review of major theories and models of personality development, social development, and emotional development, including their applications, research methods, and assessment instruments. This course examines the impact of empirical research on these theories within a historical framework. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 342 - History and Systems of Psychology


    An overview of the history of ideas about the mind and the development of psychology as a science and an academic discipline. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 351 - Biological Foundations of Behavior


    An introduction to research and perspectives on the interrelations of the brain, the mind, and behavior. A study of the brain and its anatomical and functional organization provides context for studying the origins of behavioral neuroscience. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 361 - Sport Psychology


    A course designed to examine and apply the theories, research, and applications of psychology that pertain to exercise and sport. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 391 - Psychology Internship


    An 80-100 hour field experience over the course of 12-15 weeks designed to use the skills and abilities developed in the Psychology program and apply them to a workplace related to the student’s particular interest. Both semesters.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of department chair or dean. Repeatable for up to a total of 6 credits.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 421 - Abnormal Psychology


    An examination of historical perspectives, principles of clinical diagnosis, possible causes of behavior, and classical schools of therapy. First semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 101

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 422 - Theological Integration in Psychology and Psychotherapy


    A course evaluating basic approaches to the relationship between Christianity and psychology, with special emphasis on models of psychotherapy. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 491 - Senior Seminar


    A culminating course for Psychology majors that leads to a general synthesis of and specific research in the field of study. Seniors only. Both semesters.

    Credits: 3

Recreation and Tourism

  
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    RCT 141 - Foundations of Recreation and Tourism


    An introduction to the history, philosophy, and theoretical concepts of leisure, recreation, and tourism. The focus of this course is the exploration of trends, issues, theories, models, key organizations, principal journals, and professional literature in the recreation and tourism industry. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    RCT 142 - Programming and Leadership in Recreation


    A study of the development and leadership of recreation and tourism programs and services. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the overall recreation programming process. Students are introduced to the fundamental principles and techniques necessary to plan, implement, and evaluate leisure and recreation programs and events. Topics include biblical and theological perspectives on leadership, assessing needs, developing goals and objectives, designing program services, marketing programs, implementing and delivering program services, facilitating leisure experiences, program evaluation, group dynamics, and leadership styles and methods. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    RCT 151 - Backcountry Skills and Techniques


    A field intensive course designed to introduce students to the basics of first aid treatment, effective navigation, and low impact travel in the backcountry. Emphasis is placed on Wilderness First Aid, Leave No Trace ethics, and orienteering techniques. WFA and CPR available upon successful completion of the course along with Leave No Trace Trainer qualification. Field trips required. Second semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course contains significant backcountry components and requires appropriate equipment. Course material is taught indoors and outdoors regardless of weather and conditions. Students should be appropriately prepared for long spans of time spent outdoors in varying conditions.

    Credits: 3
  
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    RCT 241 - Leisure Behavior and Diverse Populations in Recreation and Tourism


    An examination of the leisure patterns and needs of diverse populations as they specifically relate to the delivery of recreation and tourism services. Students are introduced to professional, legal, and ethical issues as they explore the impact of stereotypes, societal attitudes, personal biases, and organizational perspectives on diversity. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    RCT 242 - Travel and Tourism


    A course designed to provide students with an overview of the travel and tourism industry as an important global phenomenon. The course examines cultural, ethical, historical, behavioral, political, and economic aspects of tourism, as well as the impacts of travel and tourism on a local and global scale. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    RCT 251 - Outdoor Skills and Group Strategies


    A field intensive course that provides students the opportunity to learn and practice the outdoor skills and group management techniques necessary to become a competent outdoor instructor. Emphasis is on developing the knowledge, skills, and judgment essential to leading safe personal and group participation in a variety of outdoor activities. Students learn about, use, and maintain specialized equipment and explore methods for effective management of groups. Specific outdoor activities vary, but may include rock climbing, mountain biking, whitewater kayaking, backpacking, and skiing. Field trips required. First semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course contains significant backcountry components and requires appropriate equipment. Course material is taught indoors and outdoors regardless of weather and conditions. Students should be appropriately prepared for long spans of time spent outdoors in varying conditions.

    Credits: 3
  
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    RCT 253 - Leave No Trace Master Educator


    A study of ethical behavior in the outdoors. This course provides comprehensive training in Leave No Trace skills and ethics. Students learn how to train others in the Leave No Trace principles and explore biblical principles of stewardship. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    RCT 254 - Wilderness First Responder


    A course designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills essential to both treating ill and injured persons and making critical medical decisions in a wilderness setting. Topics include basic anatomy and physiology, patient assessment and treatment, patient care, evacuation considerations, and legal responsibilities. The course meets requirements for WFR certification. Field trips required. First semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Course material is taught indoors and outdoors regardless of weather conditions. Students should be appropriately prepared for long spans of time spent outdoors in varying conditions.

    Credits: 3
  
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    RCT 255 - Expedition Planning and Management


    An overview of the methods used in the effective planning, preparation, and management of expeditions of all types. The course explores how the topics of goal setting, leadership, team selection and training, research, budgeting and finance, transportation, logistics, risk management, and more pertain to planning and managing domestic and international expeditions. Course requirements include planning and managing an expedition. Field trips required. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    RCT 261 - Adventure and Experiential Education


    An introduction to the philosophies and foundations of adventure programming. This course explores the process of developing interpersonal, intrapersonal, and group development outcomes through adventure education. Students study adventure education in the US and develop methods for teaching and leading adventurous activities. Topics include terminology, influential individuals, key organizations, history, models, theories, benefits, transference, trends, issues, and public and private resources. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    RCT 262 - Outdoor Leadership


    A study of the theories and principles of outdoor leadership. This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to lead effectively. It explores the topics of expedition behavior, group dynamics, effective teaching, leadership styles, risk management, responsibility, decision-making, judgment, effective communication, and biblical examples of leadership. Focus is on the development of both the competencies required of an outdoor leader and a personal leadership style founded on biblical practices and perspectives. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
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    RCT 291 - Practicum


    A 45-hour field experience designed to provide insight into the recreation and tourism industry through practical application of classroom principles to the workplace. The practicum is supervised by both the cooperating organization and a University faculty member and must be completed prior to the required internship. The practicum should be arranged with the cooperating organization and approved by the student’s faculty advisor prior to enrollment in the course. Both semesters.

    Credits: 1
 

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