2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Oct 05, 2022  
2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Church Ministries

  
  •  

    CHM 221 - Spiritual Formation and Disciple-Making Ministries


    A course that explores principles and skills for the development of personal spiritual character and evangelistic outreach. Special attention is given to the spiritual and relational disciplines involved in worship, fellowship, discipleship, and witness. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHM 351 - Introduction to Web Design


    A course designed to help students understand the fundamentals of effective electronic publishing and to develop the skills that are necessary to create a professional presence on the World Wide Web for the purpose of church ministry. Topics include a philosophical understanding of computer graphic design, basic Internet terminology, html, java scripting and other concepts related to the development of web sites. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHM 361 - Critical Issues in Contemporary Urban Ministry


    An examination from an historical and biblical perspective of the social and spiritual issues relevant to contemporary urban ministry in the United States. The practical implications of these issues for ministry are emphasized. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHM 362 - Urban Ministries


    A study of the special cultural aspects, opportunities and problems of living and ministering in an urban setting. The course features case studies of growing and stagnant churches. Second semester. Offered alternate years.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHM 491 - Internship


    A course that provides senior students the opportunity for observation and practice in a field directly related to their academic preparation. Students gain practical experience by serving in a Christian organization under competent field supervisors. Faculty supervision and evaluation seminars are an integral part of the course. Either semester or Summer.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the academic advisor.

    Credits: 3

Communication Arts

  
  •  

    COM 101 - Speech


    A course designed to teach the basics of effective oral communication in public. Students prepare and present a variety of public speaking activities. Included in the course are a consideration of communication theory and the development of listening skills. Both semesters.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COM 103 - Oral Communication Seminar


    A seminar designed to teach foundational oral communication skills and their application to classroom teaching. Students will do readings in various story genres and present several in class. Lab course. Both semesters.

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    COM 331 - Introduction to Acting


    A study of the principal theories of realistic acting combined with practical experience in character creation through exercises, monologues, pantomime, improvisation and scene study. Emphasis is placed on physical and emotional character development. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COM 332 - Dramatic Production


    A study of the basic techniques of acting, directing and technical production, including a consideration of the Christian’s role in the dramatic arts. Students will participate in actual drama productions. Either semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Course fee required.

    Credits: 3

Counseling

  
  •  

    CSG 121 - Theological Integration in Counseling and Ministry


    A course designed to develop the biblical framework necessary to be an effective Christian counselor. Theological issues such as biblical anthropology, suffering, and forgiveness are integrated with counseling practice. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CSG 221 - Counseling Ministry


    A course designed to help the student develop a philosophy of counseling and to evaluate counseling paradigms and the suppositions that underlie them. Students are also exposed to essential counseling skills. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CSG 222 - Applied Biblical Counseling


    A course designed to enhance the student’s understanding of biblical counseling and to orient students to common counseling concerns including the particulars of working in individual, marriage, family, and group settings. Students begin to develop the maturity and knowledge base to be effective counselors. Second semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 101

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CSG 321 - Moral and Legal Issues in Christian Counseling


    A course that investigates the legal, ethical and moral standards that govern Christian counseling. Students learn how to design and conduct counseling ministries that comply with biblical, state and industry standards. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CSG 421 - Marriage and Family Counseling


    An in-depth examination of love, marriage and the relationships within the family. Insight into the goal and process of marriage and family counseling is gained as the complex nature of problems related to marriage and family life is explored. First semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 101

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CSG 422 - Group Theory and Practice


    A course designed to provide understanding of group therapy and practices. The focus is on the development, life cycles, dynamics, types and use of groups in a counseling or ministry context. Second semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 101

    Credits: 3

Degree Completion

  
  •  

    BIB 100D - Introduction to the Bible


    A foundational course providing an overview of the Bible and instruction on how to read the text. This course includes a study of canonicity, ancient and modern versions, and the importance of the Word of God for faith and life.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIB 101D - The Pentateuch


    A study of the five books of Moses as the foundational text to the Old and New Testaments.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIB 201D - The Old Testament


    A study of the Old Testament building upon the foundation of the Pentateuch. Attention is given to the Old Testament as the context for the New Testament.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIB 211D - The Gospels


    A study of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John and their unique contribution to the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Attention is given to the relationships between the Old Testament text and each gospel.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIB 311D - The New Testament


    A study of the New Testament, building upon the Gospels, demonstrating the interrelationship of the books.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIB 321D - Old Testament Prophets


    A study of the prophetic books (Isaiah-Malachi), including a chronology of the prophets with special attention given to the religious, social and political message of the prophets.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIB 401D - Wisdom Literature


    A study of Old Testament and New Testament wisdom texts. The student is challenged to think and act according to biblical wisdom.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIB 411D - Romans


    An exposition of the book of Romans with reference to Pauline theology as a whole. Paul’s use of the Old Testament and the book’s significance in the church and society are examined.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHM 101D - Nature and Purpose of the Local Church


    A study of biblical statements regarding the nature of the local church as God’s special instrument in the world today, including a study of the purpose for the church, and its function in producing spiritual and numerical growth. The course also includes a survey of church organization and the function of church officers.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHM 121D - Ministry Leadership and Management


    A study of a basic biblical philosophy of ministry and biblical principles of organization and administration relating to the local church and Christian organizations. Special attention is given to leadership, planning and management.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHM 241D - Foundations of Teaching and Preaching


    A study of the principles and skills necessary to effectively communicate Scripture through teaching and preaching. Opportunities are provided to practically develop these skills in the students’ ministry setting.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHM 341D - Cultural Issues in Ministry


    A study of communication and ministry across cultural barriers, investigating the difficulties, and seeking to understand the tools and actions needed to bridge the differences. The focus of the course is on missions, foreign and domestic, that reach into cultures other than one’s own.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHM 342D - Evangelism and Discipleship


    A study of the nature, purpose and process of biblical evangelism, and its application to various ministries. New Testament discipleship principles and their application are also studied. Special emphasis is placed upon building discipling relationships and small group ministry.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CSG 221D - Counseling Ministry


    A course designed to help the student develop a philosophy of counseling and to evaluate counseling paradigms and the suppositions that underlie them. Students are also exposed to essential counseling skills.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CSG 222D - Applied Biblical Counseling


    A course designed to enhance the student’s understanding of biblical counseling and to orient students to common counseling concerns including the particulars of working in individual, marriage, family, and group settings. Students begin to develop the maturity and knowledge base to be effective counselors.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CSG 321D - Moral and Legal Issues in Christian Counseling


    A course that investigates the legal, ethical and moral standards that govern Christian counseling. Students learn how to design and conduct counseling ministries that comply with biblical, state and industry standards.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CSG 421D - Marriage and Family Counseling


    An in-depth examination of love, marriage and the relationships within the family. Insight into the goal and process of marriage and family counseling is gained as the complex nature of problems related to marriage and family life is explored.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 271D - Instructional Philosophy


    An introductory study of the philosophical thought, theories, and nature of learning and instruction.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 272D - Teaching Concepts


    An introductory study of teaching methodology in which students examine the models for teaching, the nature of the student, the role of the teacher and the purpose of curriculum.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 371D - Organization and Administration


    An introductory study of issues and topics selected to prepare students in the leadership and oversight of church and para-church educational programs. Special emphasis is given to the organizational theory to create and build a community of learners.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 471D - Instructional Strategies for Diverse Learners


    An introductory study which explores issues involved in teaching many different learners. The course examines the connection between language and culture, cross-cultural communication, and social issues.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENG 121D - Writing Seminar


    A study of essay writing and research principles. It examines the elements and practice of clear, concise and literate writing. The course focuses on the ability to develop a good workable thesis into a finished product of a well-developed essay and short research paper. Elective.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HUM 441D - Contemporary Culture: Perspective/Issues


    A study that seeks to develop Christian perspectives on human culture and relate them to specific cultural issues facing Christians today. An initial segment of study on cultural perspectives is followed by an application of these to selected current issues. Elective.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    INT 491D - Research Writing and Project Design


    The Applied Research Project is the opportunity for students to synthesize the competencies they have acquired from the degree completion curriculum, research, and their work experience. The topic must have practical application to the student’s personal life or career setting. The project design consists of a description of the problem to be studied, correlating questions about the topic to be research, and biblical and literature reviews leading to a description of a proposed program or evaluation.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    INT 492D - Professional Field Integration


    The Applied Research Project is the opportunity for students to synthesize the competencies they have acquired from the degree completion curriculum, research, and their work experience. The project integration consists of the a design creation, implement of an intervention, and written documentation of the project. Student presents the completed project in a presentation.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MIS 441D - Intercultural Communication


    A study of the principles of effective communication with a focus on the special problems involved in communicating the gospel across cultural and subcultural boundaries. Elective.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ORL 221D - Communication Concepts


    An introductory study of the concepts of effective oral and written communication, including how to function in small groups and organizational settings as well as interpersonal relationships.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ORL 222D - Accounting and Finance


    An introductory study of the theories of finance and their application to decision making. Special attention is given to banking services, financial statements, business statistics, and financial problems in both profit and non-profit organizations.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ORL 321D - Organizational Leadership


    An introductory study of the personal and professional dimensions of leadership. Special emphasis is on assisting students to develop a personal code of ethics and assess their own behavior.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ORL 421D - Change Theory


    An introductory study of the role of organizational change and decision-making within church and professional communities. The course provides an overview of the topic through the use of case studies.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    THE 100D - Introduction to Christian Theology


    An introduction to major doctrines of Christianity and to theological method: biblical, systematic, and historical theology. The relevance of the truths of these doctrines to life is explored.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    THE 301D - Church History


    A study of the church from A.D. 100 to the present. Attention is given to important historical events, the development of church doctrine, and the relationship of the church to society.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    THE 311D - The Triune God


    A study of the nature and work of the God of the Bible in His triunity, including an exploration of the implications for the Christian life.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    THE 312D - The Narrative of Redemption


    A study of God’s work in bringing salvation to the world from the original creation to the new creation through Jesus Christ, tracing the development of the doctrine through church history.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    THE 401D - Apologetics


    A study of the defense of the Gospel based on arguments for truth concerning God, man, and salvation in interaction with various approaches to truth both past and present.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    THE 451D - Church and Eschatology


    A study of the distinct origin, nature and destiny of the church, and an analysis of the scriptural teaching concerning prophecy and things to come, including a delineation of the dispensational-premillennial position of the University.

    Credits: 3

Early Childhood Education

  
  •  

    ECH 122 - Instructional Design and Assessment


    A course of study in which students examine and apply an overall approach to instruction and assessment based on the developmental characteristics of PK-4th students, current learning theory, and best practices. Students develop, implement, assess, and modify curriculum and lessons to demonstrate understanding of differentiated instruction and formative assessment practices. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECH 221 - Early Development and Learning


    A course designed to examine the historical and philosophical foundations of Early Childhood Education and the developmental milestones, principles and theories, and multiple influences on development and learning for children birth to age nine. Candidates apply the implications of child development and learning in designing the learning experiences and environments young children need to prepare them to learn to succeed in school. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECH 222 - Early Language and Literacy Development


    A course to prepare candidates to assess and develop the language and emergent literacy skills of children birth to age five, using developmentally appropriate practices and research-based instructional strategies. Based on assessment information, candidates develop and deliver learning experiences in spoken language, expression skills, phonological development, and language comprehension to meet targeted needs. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECH 321 - PK-4 Social Studies Methods


    A course to prepare candidates to develop, implement, assess, and modify curriculum and lessons in the main themes of social studies in the PK-4th elementary level as identified by the National Council for the Social Studies and Pennsylvania’s learning standards. The social studies curriculum, including history, geography, economics, civics, and government, is integrated with the central theme of promoting civic competence. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECH 322 - PK-4 Science, Health, and Physical Education Methods


    A course to prepare candidates to develop, implement, assess, and modify curriculum and lessons in science, scientific inquiry, health, and physical education at the PK-4th elementary level as identified by the National Science Education Standards, the National Association for Sport and Physical Education, and the Pennsylvania learning standards. Instruction is based on conceptual themes and strategies that involve first-hand exploration and investigation. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECH 323 - Integrated Language Arts Primary


    A course designed to build conceptual understanding of the interrelated components of reading and writing, to prepare candidates to assess, develop, modify, and integrate instruction in the language arts within the context of literature and across content areas. Based on knowledge of Pennsylvania standards and anchors for PK-4th grade, candidates review literacy programs and research-based instructional strategies to develop integrated language arts units. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECH 324 - Early Childhood Mathematics


    A course to prepare candidates to actively engage PK-4th grade students in learning mathematical concepts, methods, and language through developmentally appropriate, research-based learning experiences and instructional strategies that strengthen children’s problem-solving and reasoning processes. Candidates apply the content and process standards of the National Council for Teachers of Mathematics and the State of Pennsylvania in analyzing curriculum and designing differentiated instruction to meet diverse needs. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECH 325 - Integrating the Creative Arts


    A survey of the principles and elements of the creative arts–music, visual arts, theatre, movement–to prepare candidates with the knowledge, materials, and strategies to effectively integrate the creative arts within the content areas to enhance learning, to promote creative expression, and to encourage appreciation of the arts. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECH 422 - Developmental and Diagnostic Reading Primary


    A course to prepare candidates in the administration and interpretation of diagnostic and formative assessments to inform and monitor literacy instruction. Candidates demonstrate their ability to match research-based literacy interventions and instructional strategies to identified student needs by assessing and interpreting a 1st-4th grade child’s progress and learning in a semester-long tutoring project. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECH 423 - PK-4 Assessment and Adaptations


    A course designed to explore the philosophy, design, and use of a balanced assessment system to plan and facilitate instruction, determine student proficiency, and improve student learning. Candidates examine, interpret, and use traditional and alternative, formative and summative, formal and informal assessments to determine and report levels of performance and monitor student progress. Candidates demonstrate understanding of the IEP process and the legally acceptable assessment modifications and accommodations for students with disabilities. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECH 424 - Family and Community Partnerships


    A course to prepare candidates with the understanding and skills to create and sustain respectful, reciprocal relationships with families, school professionals, related service providers, and community resources to support a child’s development and learning and enhance the school program. Candidates examine and apply Pennsylvania and National Association for the Education of Young Children regulations and standards that serve programs from birth to fourth grade. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECH 425 - Assessing and Managing Behavior


    A course designed to build understanding of the value of and the strategies for creating a positive, inclusive community of learners. Candidates apply knowledge of child development and positive management techniques to design instruction and manage an environment that encourages student autonomy in making responsible decisions, in using problem solving strategies, and in learning and playing cooperatively. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECH 491 - Applied Learning Strategies I


    A two-week field experience designed to provide insight into the nature of PK-K or 1st-4th grade teaching through daily classroom lesson planning and teaching, classroom management, personal journaling, interaction with teachers, and seminar discussions. J Term.

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    ECH 492 - Applied Learning Strategies II


    A three-week field experience designed to provide insight into the nature of PK-K or 1st-4th grade teaching through daily classroom lesson planning and teaching, classroom management, personal journaling, interaction with teachers, and seminar discussions. Summer.

    Credits: 2

Education

  
  •  

    EDU 101 - Foundations of Education


    A first-level course for all teacher education majors designed to introduce the student to the teaching profession, to the University program for teacher preparation, and to the origins and development of educational thought. The historical context and the sociological dynamics of educational thought are examined and evaluated in light of their impact on education today. Both semesters.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 241 - Instructional Design and Assessment 4-8


    A course in which students observe and develop a model for middle level education. This model accounts for a coherent philosophy of middle school education, including middle level student transitions, appropriate instructional strategies, and formal and informal assessments. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 251 - Teaching Methods in the Secondary School


    An overview of applications of learning theory and teaching methodology for the humanities and arts, the social sciences, and the natural sciences and mathematics, at the secondary level. The underlying structure of each subject area is examined, and models for teaching are developed and used. Micro-teaching and unit preparation focusing on national and PA Academic Standards are integral parts of this course. This lab course meets three times a week for two credits. First semester.

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    EDU 291 - Pre-Student Teaching 1


    A practicum in which candidates work with small groups of students in school or in after school settings under the supervision of a certified teacher. The focus of Pre-Student Teaching 1 is mathematics instruction. Both semesters, summer, and J Term.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EDU 241

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    EDU 292 - Pre-Student Teaching 2


    A practicum in which candidates work with small groups of students in school or in after school settings under the supervision of a certified teacher. The focus of Pre-Student Teaching 2 is science instruction. Both semesters, summer, and J Term.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EDU 241

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    EDU 301 - Educational Technology


    A course in which students examine and prepare to apply the integration of educational technology into the experiences of the regular classroom to enhance learning, engage students in inquiry and problem solving, and enable clear communication between home and school. Integrative demonstrations, interdisciplinary unit planning, and web page design projects facilitate student application of course content. Either semester.

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    EDU 341 - Mathematics Instruction, Assessment, and Technology 4-8


    A course designed to prepare students to teach mathematics in the middle level setting. Explicit attention is given to the use of Pennsylvania Academic standards and Assessment Anchors, the evaluation of appropriate curricula and technology for middle level mathematics, and the selection of multiple appropriate formative and summative assessments. Lab course. First semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisites: EDU 342 and EDU 343

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    EDU 342 - Science Instruction, Assessment, and Technology 4-8


    A course designed to prepare students to teach science in the middle level setting. Explicit attention is given to the use of Pennsylvania Academic standards and Assessment Anchors, the evaluation of appropriate curricula and technology for middle level science, and the selection of multiple appropriate formative and summative assessments. Lab course. First semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisites: EDU 341 & EDU 343

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    EDU 343 - Social Studies Instruction, Assessment, and Technology 4-8


    A course designed to prepare students to teach social studies in the middle level setting. Explicit attention is given to the use of Pennsylvania Academic standards and Assessment Anchors, the evaluation of appropriate curricula and technology for middle level studies, and the selection of multiple appropriate formative and summative assessments. Lab course. First semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisites: EDU 341 & EDU 342

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    EDU 351 - Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum for Diverse Learners


    A course designed to prepare prospective secondary education teachers and K-12 teachers to develop students’ reading, writing, and processing skills across the content areas. Special attention is given to developing reading and writing proficiency for diverse learners and struggling readers. Students write and teach lessons, create activities, and develop resource files related to their particular content area. Second semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EDU 251

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 361 - Educational Technology to Support Instruction for Diverse Populations


    A course that studies a variety of instructional technology supports for special needs students that can also be used effectively with the general education population in basic content areas such as reading, math, and language. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 391 - Pre-Student Teaching 3


    A practicum in which candidates work under the supervision of a certified teacher. The focus of Pre-Student Teaching 3 is reading instruction. Both semesters, summer, and J Term.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EDU 441

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    EDU 392 - Pre-Student Teaching 4


    A practicum in which candidates work with groups of upper elementary students under the supervision of a certified upper elementary teacher.  Candidates also participate in after-school instructional and reflective meetings with the University Supervisor. The emphasis of the after-school seminars is on developing the philosophy and practice of upper elementary classroom management and discipline. Summer and J Term.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EDU 241

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    EDU 393 - Pre-Student Teaching 5


    A practicum in which candidates work with groups of middle school students under the supervision of an interdisciplinary team. Candidates also participate in after-school instructional and reflective meetings with the University Supervisor. The emphasis of the after-school seminars is on developing a philosophy of middle school classroom management, discipline, transitions, and interdisciplinary teaming. Summer and J Term.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EDU 341, EDU 342, & EDU 343

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    EDU 401 - Philosophy of School Education


    A course designed to help students develop a philosophy of school education. The course includes a review of ancient and contemporary philosophical thought and theories of education, and an examination of belief statements related to the aims of education, the nature of the student and learning, the role of the teacher, and the nature and purpose of the curriculum. Particular attention is given to worldview integration in the strategic design of the curriculum. Both semesters.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHI 301

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 402 - Educational Assessment


    A course designed to explore the design, methods, and use of a balanced assessment system to determine student proficiency in meeting learning targets and to improve student learning. Methods include traditional test construction, simple statistics, standardized testing, as well as alternative assessments, including portfolio and performance task design. Topics include current trends in assessment, preparation and reporting of grades, differentiated learning, and accommodations for special needs. Prerequisite: at least one pedagogy course. Either semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    At least one pedagogy course.

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    EDU 411 - Practicum


    A three-week field experience designed to provide insight into the nature of elementary or secondary school teaching through daily classroom observation and teaching, personal journaling, interaction with teachers, assigned readings and seminar discussions. A minimum of fifteen days in a classroom is required. Both semesters and summer (May).

    Prerequisites & Notes
    See criteria in School of Education Handbook. Course fee required.

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    EDU 441 - Developmental and Diagnostic Reading in the Middle School


    A course in diagnostic reading instruction with an emphasis on philosophy, methods, and materials for developing reading skills and strategies in the content areas in grades four through eight. Demonstrations and tutoring experiences supplement class experience. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 443 - Educational Assessment and Adaptations 4-8


    A course designed to explore the philosophy, design, and use of a balanced assessment system to plan and facilitate instruction, determine student proficiency, and improve student learning. Candidates examine, interpret, and use traditional and alternative, formative and summative, formal and informal assessments to determine and report levels of performance and monitor student progress. Candidates demonstrate understanding of the IEP process and the legally acceptable assessment modifications and accommodations for students with disabilities. Second semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 451 - Teaching Bible in the Secondary School


    An analysis of curriculum materials, lesson preparation and methodologies unique to the Christian high school. Students examine and develop a biblical philosophy and model for Bible teaching. Practice in lesson and unit preparation is included. Either semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EDU 251

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 452 - Teaching English in the Secondary School


    A course designed to help prospective English teachers develop appropriate understandings and techniques for the instruction and evaluation of the three major language arts components in the secondary school: reading and literature, composition and grammar, and communication. Students participate in a tutoring experience that enables them to practice the integration of all the language arts components. Second semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EDU 251

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 453 - Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School


    A course designed to expose the prospective mathematics teacher to the curriculum principles and standards for mathematics as published by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the PA Academic Standards 7-12. The course includes a study of the structure of mathematics, the nature of learning mathematics, and instructional models and methodology used to teach mathematics at the secondary level. Second semester. Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EDU 251

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 454 - Teaching Social Studies in the Secondary School


    A course designed to help social studies education majors develop approaches and methodology for teaching the social sciences at the secondary level. Overall course and unit plans, methodology specific to the social sciences and to the adolescent learner, and assessment strategies are examined and developed. Either semester. Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EDU 251

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 459 - Educational Assessment and Adaptations 7-12


    A course designed to explore the philosophy, design, and use of a balanced assessment system to plan and facilitate instruction, determine student proficiency, and improve student learning at the secondary level. Candidates examine, interpret, and use traditional and alternative, formative and summative, formal and informal assessments to determine and report levels of performance and monitor student progress. Candidates demonstrate understanding of the IEP process and the legally acceptable assessment modifications and accommodations for students with disabilities. Second semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    At least one pedagogy course.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 462 - The Diverse Learner: Learning Styles, Multiple Intelligences, Children at Risk


    A course that examines the variety of learning styles that influence the way students and teachers interpret their world, the multiple intelligences as identified by Howard Gardner, and the variety of at-risk student populations presented in the classroom (e.g., at risk due to divorce, learning difficulties, cyberspace, bullying). Differentiated instruction, curriculum applications, teaching strategies, classroom management, and assessment specific to the diverse learner are examined. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 469 - Instructional Delivery Systems for Special Needs Populations


    A course that studies, observes, and practices effective instructional delivery systems for the special needs population, including support services intervention and collaborative professional and family partnerships. Either semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDU 501 - Discipline Seminar


    A course designed to expose the student to a variety of models for classroom management and discipline. Students develop their own personal philosophy of discipline, establishing principles and practices that can be used in service. The unique product of this course is a discipline plan. Both semesters.

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    EDU 590 - Professional Seminar


    A series of seminars on professional issues and topics selected by the faculty to help prepare students for entry into the teaching profession. Runs concurrently with student teaching each semester. Both semesters.

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    EDU 591 - Student Teaching I


    A six- or nine-week experience in practice teaching in a regular school classroom. ACSI-only programs require nine weeks in a private school. All other programs require a minimum of six weeks in this experience and an additional seven weeks in a public school. Students teach under the supervision of highly qualified teachers and University faculty. Both semesters.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    See School of Education Handbook. Course fee required.

    Credits: 6/9
  
  •  

    EDU 592 - Student Teaching II


    A seven-week experience in practice teaching in a local public school classroom. Students teach under the supervision of a highly qualified teacher in a local school district. This experience is required for public school programs only. Both semesters.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    See School of Education Handbook. Course fee required.

    Credits: 6
  
  •  

    EDU 593 - Student Teaching


    A thirteen-week experience in practice teaching in a regular school classroom. Students teach under the supervision of highly qualified teachers and University faculty. Both semesters.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    See School of Education Handbook. Course fee required.

    Credits: 9

English

  
  •  

    ENG 021 - Introduction to College Reading and Writing


    A course that teaches the student the basics of college level reading and writing. Emphasis is on reading comprehension and the basic rhetorical skills (narration, description, comparison/contrast, exposition) related to writing. Credits do not count toward graduation. First semester.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENG 101 - English Composition


    A course that examines the principles and practice of clear, concise and literate writing. It introduces the student to research writing and documentation, and provides a foundation for future academic writing. Both semesters.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENG 321 - Advanced Composition


    A workshop for advanced students of writing. Focus is determined on the basis of student interest and ability. Emphasis is placed on writing essays and articles suitable for publication. First semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENG 322 - Creative Writing


    A writing seminar exposing the student to the techniques employed to yield successful imaginative writing of poetry, fiction and drama. Second semester. Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 3
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7