2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Nov 27, 2022  
2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Student Life


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Undergraduate (All Programs)


Students

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The student undergraduate enrollment of approximately 1,050 is distributed between men and women in a ratio of 46 percent to 54 percent. During the past five years students have come from almost all the states and 47 foreign countries. Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York have the largest representation. Fifty percent are resident students; 15 percent, married students; 17 percent, minority students; and 2 percent, international students.

Standards of Conduct

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Philadelphia Biblical University is a community of students, faculty, and staff who, in accomplishing the mission of the University, join together for academic enrichment, personal development, spiritual growth, and preparation for Christian ministry. Relationships and responsibilities in this community are built upon (1) the teachings and principles of the inerrant and authoritative Word of God (2 Timothy 3:16-17), (2) the personal accountability of each member to a loving and sovereign God (1 Peter 1:17), and (3) the inner resources and enabling of the Holy Spirit to guide and minister to each other in all relationships (John 16:13-14).

Members of the University community should seek first and foremost to achieve the goal stated in 1 Corinthians 10:31, namely, “whatever you do, do all to the glory of God.” All activities and relationships should seek to accomplish this ultimate objective. In relationships with one another, members are to be guided by the following scriptural admonitions:

LOVE: “This is the message which you have heard from the beginning, that we should love one another.” (1 John 3:11)

EDIFICATION: “Now we who are strong ought to bear the weaknesses of those without strength and not just please ourselves. Let each of us please his neighbor for his good, to his edification.” (Romans 15:1-2)

BEARING ONE ANOTHER’S BURDEN: “Bear one another’s burdens, and thus fulfill the law of Christ.” (Galatians 6:2)

SPEAKING THE TRUTH IN LOVE: “But speaking the truth in love, we are to grow up in all aspects into Him, who is the head, even, Christ.” (Ephesians 4:15)

RESPONSIBILITY TO OTHER BELIEVERS: “But take care lest this liberty of yours somehow become a stumbling block to the weak.” (1 Corinthians 8:9)

RESTORATION AND RESTITUTION: “Brethren, if a man is caught in any trespass, you who are spiritual, restore such a one in a spirit of gentleness; looking to yourself, lest you too be tempted.” (Galatians 6:1)

The following standards and expectations apply to all University employees and all students while enrolled at the University:

  1. Scripture specifically prohibits stealing, sexual immorality, lying, cheating, gossiping, hate speech against one another, profane language, occult practices, and attitudes such as pride, lust, bitterness, jealousy and an unforgiving spirit. These prohibitions are clearly understood to be biblical commands that are binding upon every Christian believer.
     
  2. Any kind of demeaning gesture, threat of violence, or physical attack directed toward another person will not be tolerated. Vandalism and stealing of property, services, or goods are also unacceptable.
     
  3. Because of the biblical teaching concerning the dignity and worth of every person, harassment or discrimination against others on the basis of race, national origin, sex, or handicap is not acceptable. University employees and students whose speech or action violates laws or University regulations or policies will be subject to discipline and/or dismissal.
     
  4. The use of tobacco, alcoholic beverages, hallucinogenic drugs, and substances (including marijuana) or narcotics not authorized by a physician presents a great danger to the physical and psychological well-being of the user. Therefore, University employees and students should refrain from the possession, use, or distribution of these and similar elements on or away from campus. Night clubs, bars, and similar places are to be avoided.
     
  5. University employees and students should be sensitive regarding the testimony of their personal lives in representing the Lord Jesus Christ, His Church, and the University. They should be highly selective in their choices of entertainment, and recreation including television, videos, motion pictures, theater, sports, reading materials, and music. Biblical standards, especially those in reference to immorality, worldly values, violence, profanity, sexuality, and nudity, should serve as guidelines in making personal discretionary decisions in these areas. R-rated movies, however, are not permitted on campus or at University-sponsored activities.

    The University understands that there are varying attitudes among Christians regarding some of these issues and desires not to be offensive to the conscience of any believer. Therefore, although students are free to make discretionary decisions in these areas, they should be sensitive and submissive to the standards of their family and local church.
     
  6. Pornographic materials are destructive and immoral and are not to be viewed, possessed, or distributed on or away from campus. E-mail and internet sites which are sexually explicit should be avoided. They should not be copied or transmitted to other people.
     
  7. Because a significant number of evangelical Christians view social dancing as a morally questionable activity, social dancing is not permitted on campus or at University-sponsored activities. Choreography in drama and musical productions is permitted.
     
  8. Gambling is viewed as an unwise use of God-given resources and therefore is not acceptable in any form on or away from campus. University employees and students should not attend places where gambling is the source of business or entertainment.
     
  9. University employees and students are subject to the responsibility of academic integrity which demands honesty and giving credit to the proper sources.
     
  10. The Lord’s Day (Sunday) is set apart primarily for worship, fellowship, ministry, and rest for God’s people. Therefore, the scheduling of University programs, services, and athletic events that are not designed to promote worship, fellowship, or ministry on Sundays is not encouraged.

Standards of dress and personal grooming are stipulated in the various Student Handbooks and are in force during the academic semesters.

Prospective students should assess their willingness to abide by all of these standards during their student days. Students who are not comfortable in such a community setting cannot enjoy the maximum benefits of a PBU education. When understood and applied as intended, University standards foster character building, spiritual maturity and professional growth.

Health Services

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In addition to excellent community medical resources, including hospitals and doctors’ offices, the University has a student healthcare facility on the Langhorne campus. The Health Center has regular hours Monday through Friday. Emergency health situations during off hours should be handled by calling 911, security, and the respective Resident Assistant.

Alumni Services

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The Alumni Association exists to foster a sense of community among the University’s alumni family by providing effective channels for communication, fellowship, and growth. These ministries are designed to create an enthusiastic relationship with other alumni and the University.

Annually, homecoming weekend is a premiere event for the University family which provides a special opportunity for reunions and celebrations among former students of all ages. Alumni are kept up-to-date regarding activities, regional get-togethers, and news of interest through the PBU Today magazine, periodic mailings, and monthly E-Letters.

PBU grads have distinguished themselves in churches, missions, schools, businesses, politics, communities, homes and families for over 90 years. The Office of Alumni Relations considers it an honor to proudly represent approximately 15,000 alumni who have made an impact for Christ around the globe.

Alumni Discount Policy

Undergraduate Classes or Continuing Education

Depending on availability of space baccalaureate or continuing education graduates of the University may audit without cost one course each semester at the same level of their prior studies (i.e., baccalaureate graduates may audit bachelor’s level courses; graduates of the continuing education program may audit continuing education courses). The audit cannot be registered until after the scheduled registration day, and the policy applies only to regularly rostered courses not already closed (e.g., not courses such as an independent study or student teaching). A $6 per credit service fee will be charged. Alumni who have graduated more than a semester prior to auditing a course must reapply for admission and pay the application fee.

See also below for student life information about specific programs.

Bachelor’s Degree Programs

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This information is specific to the Bachelor’s Degree Programs. To obtain additional Student Life information which is common to all undergraduate programs, see above.

Spiritual Life

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Spiritual maturity is stressed at Philadelphia Biblical University. Chapel services, class devotions, annual conferences, and regular church attendance provide opportunities for worship, instruction, and challenge. Class meetings, residence hall meetings, and Student Missionary Fellowship meetings offer the student the privilege and responsibility of regular intercessory prayer. Student Ministry requirements involving the student in outreach stimulate personal spiritual development. It is vital for the University community that individuals regularly assess their contribution to the spiritual welfare of the total body. Faculty members and counselors are available to discuss spiritual matters with students.

Counseling Services

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Every effort is made to provide help for students. Students are offered opportunity to secure guidance concerning their personal, spiritual, and academic life. Resident Assistants offer counseling in the dormitories for resident students. The professional departments provide the added help of academic or vocational counseling. The Oasis Counseling Center offers counseling as well as support groups for students who feel they would like to talk with someone about personal issues.

Commuters

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Approximately 50 percent of the student body are commuters. A concentrated effort is made to include commuters in the activities and programs of the University. A Commuter Council is elected by commuters to represent their interests within the University structure.

Resident Students

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The University’s residence halls are considered an educational context in which most of life’s demands can be encountered in microcosm. Students learn self-discipline, consideration for others, self-sacrifice, and other Christian virtues that contribute to a life of effective service. Christian fellowship is experienced on a day-to-day basis.

Life in the dormitory is supervised by the Resident Council composed of Resident Assistants, Resident Directors, and the Director of Resident Life. As employees of the University they are responsible to help students develop mature habits of Christian living, encourage Christian fellowship, counsel residents, discuss and resolve functional and interpersonal problems, and enforce University regulations. The policies that govern life in the residence halls are stated in the Undergraduate Student Handbook. Single students under the age of 22 are expected to live in the residence halls provided by the University unless commuting from home.

Social Life

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At the University, students enjoy friendships that become lifelong. To complement class and club activities, the University Social Committee plans monthly social functions for the entire University family. Activities include concerts, films, roller skating, class functions, a Spring Formal, and open house evenings in the residence halls.

Athletics

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The University has an intercollegiate athletic program for both men and women. PBU is affiliated with the National Collegiate Athletic Association as an active member of Division III and with the National Christian College Athletic Association as a Division II member.

Sports for men include soccer, basketball, tennis, baseball, golf, and volleyball. Women’s sports include field hockey, soccer, basketball, softball, tennis, volleyball, and cheerleading.

An extensive intramural program provides opportunity for students to experience athletic competition in a recreational environment and profit from physical exercise. Intramural sports include a wide variety of individual and team sports for men and women.

Recreational facilities include a fitness center with varied exercise equipment as well as a gymnasium and field space. Four tennis courts are available for play as weather permits.

Music Ensembles

As an important part of the ministry and outreach of the University, PBU music groups present sacred concerts at the University and in the Greater Philadelphia area. The Chorale takes an annual concert tour. Other musical groups include Chamber Singers, Hosanna, Joy, Symphony Orchestra, Symphonic Band, Community Chorus, Chapel Choir, Brass Ensemble, and Handbell Choir. A description of each group appears in the course description section.

Academic Fellowship

Many academic programs have a student fellowship or organization which meets several times a semester. These groups stimulate interaction among students and encourage relationships with professionals in the same field.

Student Organizations

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Extracurricular activities broaden the student’s base of education and deepen the level of personal experience. The development of abilities in extracurricular experiences is of prime importance to the student preparing for Christian ministry. The following student organizations provide opportunity for leadership growth.

Brothers and Sisters in Christ (BASIC)/Mu Kappa

This group is designed to provide opportunities for students from diverse backgrounds to contribute to the University community. Activities include chapel presentations, community outreach and special programs.

Class Organizations

Each year classes elect officers who lead them in their social, devotional, and service activities. Retreats are often included in annual class events. In the freshman year, a faculty advisor is selected to guide the class through its University experience.

Commuter Council

Almost one-half of the students at PBU are commuters. The Commuter Council represents their unique interests and needs and, in addition, assists entering students to get involved in University life.

Cultural Awareness Association

This group provides opportunities for ethnically diverse students to make the University aware of the unique contributions of various cultures. This is accomplished through social programming, discussing causes, and chapel presentations.

Milestone

The University yearbook staff prepares a record of the events and spirit of the year, and at the same time learns basic publication techniques.

The Scroll

As the official student newspaper, The Scroll offers students the challenge to utilize and develop journalistic skills in publishing the news that is of interest to the student body.

Student Missions Fellowship

This organization acquaints students with the various areas of missions outreach and sustains a prayer ministry for missionaries. Funds are raised for the purpose of sending students on summer missions assignments and to contribute to other missions projects.

Student Senate

The Student Senate is composed of elected representatives from each class and major extracurricular organization. It serves as the student representative body and liaison between students and the administration, and faculty.

Student Theological Society

This organization exists to foster spiritual growth and intellectual development by encouraging the exchange of theological concepts among students.

University Social Committee

Composed of representatives from each class and various student interest groups, this committee is responsible for University student social functions. It is an official component of the Student Senate.

Advance Degree Completion Program

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This information is specific to the Advance Degree Completion Program. To obtain student life information which is common to all undergraduate programs, see above.

Communication

Advance News (e-news), published regularly, is the official news and notes of the degree completion program. Persons having announcements, testimonies, or information of interest to the Advance community may submit them to the Advance office for possible inclusion. All submissions for publication are subject to editing and the Advance office also reserves the right to limit the number of items published per event. Official announcements, group news, and additions and/or changes to Advance policy will appear in Advance News.

Faculty Counseling/Advising Services

All students receive academic advisement to assist in their academic, professional and personal decision-making. Advising is provided by the Advance staff.

Certificate Programs

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Wisconsin Wilderness

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This information is specific to the Wisconsin Wilderness Program. To obtain student life information which is common to all undergraduate programs, see above.

Students benefit from the positive, family-like atmosphere of WWC. The limited enrollment ensures that students receive more personal attention and grow in interpersonal skills. Experienced and caring staff members live on campus and provide students with guidance and direction. Visiting professors stay on campus for the week and are readily available for interaction in and out of the classroom.

There are many opportunities in nearby communities for students to participate in service projects and church ministry. Many social activities such as coffee houses, talent shows, movie and game nights, concerts, and banquets are planned throughout the year.

Contributing to the uniqueness of WWC is its recreational location. WWC utilizes other facilities, locations and outfitters in the north woods to provide a full array of recreational opportunities. The campus-organized program includes canoe trips, mountain biking day trips, ropes courses, hiking trips, waterskiing, indoor rock climbing, cross-country skiing, broomball, ice skating, downhill skiing, and snowboarding. Other area recreational opportunities abound. These include fishing, backpacking, kayaking, horseback riding, camping, and snowmobiling.

Bible Enrichment

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This information is specific to the Bible Enrichment program, offered only in Liberty Corner, New Jersey. To obtain student life information which is common to all undergraduate programs, see above.

Students enrolled in the Bible Enrichment program receive academic advisement to assist in their academic, professional and personal-decision making. Advising is provided by the School of Lifelong Learning staff.

Jewish Studies

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This information is specific to the Institute of Jewish Studies program. To obtain student life information which is common to all undergraduate programs, see above.

Conduct

Since IJS students are considered PBU students, all IJS students are under the authority of the Student Development Department of PBU in areas of conduct, dress, and residence hall life. They are expected to comply with PBU’s standards.

Due to the intensive nature of the program, prospective students should come prepared to give their full attention to the program. Fifteen to 20 hours of outside work weekly is the maximum allowed for full-time students (those taking three courses per module). Any exception to this regulation should be discussed with the director prior to acceptance as a student. Students who need to work more than 20 hours per week may extend the academic program over two years so they will not fall under the work restriction.

Chapel

Each Friday IJS meets for its own “family” chapel. The purpose of IJS chapel is to stimulate growth, encourage deeper fellowship among the school family, and worship the Lord together. The IJS chapel program is varied, with speakers from outside and inside the school and opportunities for testimony and group prayer. The emphasis is on informality and spontaneity as well as careful presentation of the Word and its application to godly living. Each Monday and Wednesday, IJS students attend the regular undergraduate Chapel service.

Student Ministry

To implement learning, every student must be involved in some form of student ministry. Friends of Israel staff members are available to guide students in evangelistic outreaches on college campuses, in monthly fellowships, hospital visitation, Bible studies, and in unique opportunities for ministry with Jewish people.

Biblical Foundations

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This information is specific to the Biblical Foundations program. To obtain student life information which is common to all undergraduate programs, see above.

Conduct

Since Biblical Foundations students are considered PBU students, all Biblical Foundations students are under the authority of the Student Development Department of PBU in areas of conduct, dress, and dormitory life. They are expected to comply with PBU’s standards.

Due to the intensive nature of the program, prospective students should come prepared to give their full attention to the program. Fifteen to 20 hours of outside work weekly is the maximum allowed for full-time students (those taking three courses per module). Any exception to this regulation should be discussed with the dean prior to acceptance as a student. Students who need to work more than 20 hours per week may extend the academic program over two years so they will not fall under the work restriction.

Chapel

Each Friday Biblical Foundations students meet with IJS for their own “family” chapel. The purpose of this chapel is to stimulate growth, encourage deeper fellowship among the school family, and worship the Lord together. The chapel program is varied, with speakers from outside and inside the school and opportunities for testimony and group prayer. The emphasis is on informality and spontaneity as well as careful presentation of the Word and its application to godly living. Each Monday and Wednesday, Biblical Foundations students attend the regular undergraduate Chapel service.

Student Ministry

To implement learning, every student must be involved in some form of student ministry. Friends of Israel staff members are available to guide students in evangelistic outreaches on college campuses, in monthly fellowships, hospital visitation, Bible studies, and in unique opportunities for ministry with Jewish people.